Reveiw of August 2015 Concert

Classical Programme Delights Audience

With the cold weather we have been experiencing, the audience needed to be well rugged up in St Matthews Church for the August concert.   However with Haydn, Bach and Mozart on the programme, what more could the purists desire?   It was certainly an afternoon of absolute delight and every one of the listeners went away glowing with praise for the choice of music presented.

Haydn’s “Laudon” Symphony was first up with its copious elegant melodic content.   The Symphony was named after a distinguished Austrian General, (Ernst Gideon Freiherr von Laudon) but not because it was militaristic or martial in style.   At that time it became fashionable to name works after famous citizens in order to promote more sales of the sheet music.   This particular symphony was somewhat different in style from his previous symphonic works, and showed wonderful elegant melodies that flowed one after the other and also showed Haydn’s skill in orchestration.  He wrote over a hundred symphonies and this particular one would mark his further development in symphonic composition.    The orchestra’s performance was well received.

Huw Dann (Principal trumpet with the APO) was the soloist in the very popular Haydn Trumpet concerto which followed the Symphony.   In this work the soloist and conductor collaborated well and chose tempi that suited the instrument and also plumbed the utmost benefit from the wonderful acoustics of the building.    Dann’s fingering of the many melismas in the concerto was crystal clear and an absolute joy to hear a work that is so familiar, performed with such style.   Michael Joel’s direction of the orchestra was sympathetic and supportive at all times and the performance was given a well-deserved ovation.

Following the interval, Dann with a piccolo trumpet joined Peter Mumby and Nicholas Allan in the trumpet section of the orchestra for the Bach orchestral Suite in D major.    This work features the well-known “Air on G String” in the first movement with the violins playing the air while the cellos provided the accompaniment.   In the following section the trumpets soared high above the rest of the orchestra to great effect and this was followed by two French dance movements, a gavotte and a bourree.   The trumpets again featured in the final movement, a gigue, and again playing high above the orchestra to spectacular effect.    Penny Christiansen swapped her first violin and played the harpsichord for this work.

Mozart’s symphony number 38 (known as the “Prague” Symphony) tends to be overshadowed by his final three symphonies (numbers 39, 40 and 41), but despite that it has some wonderful melodic development that can be appreciated.   Throughout the concert, music director Michael Joel showed sympathetic control of the orchestra and opted for tempi that enabled the players, especially the strings to play at their very best.   We heard in this performance some of the best string playing that the orchestra has achieved this year and they were rewarded by a most appreciative audience.

Don’t miss the next SMCO concert on the 20th September, featuring cello soloist Catherine Kwak in the Elgar Concerto, with conductor James Tennant presenting the Barber of Seville overture and Dvorak’s Eighth Symphony.

Robert O’Hara