Reveiw of May 2015 Concert

Soloist Camille Wells Oboe concerto creates a very expressive atmosphere for our May concert.

St Matthew’s Chamber Orchestra performed the second concert in its 2015 subscription series on Sunday 17 May. The conductor was David Sharp, who has been a regular conductor of SMCO over a number of years. His conducting style was direct and confident and his rapport with the orchestra was very evident.

Opening the concert was an early work of Schubert – his Overture in C in the Italian Style. It was written after Schubert had heard Rossini’s opera, Tancredi. It begins with a slow and rather majestic adagio before launching into a lively and tuneful section. The orchestra played with enthusiasm and accuracy, with excellent contributions from woodwind and brass.

A contemporary work for oboe and strings followed. Written by Eric Ewazen, it was commissioned by Linda Strommen in memory of her father. Linda Strommen is a former oboe teacher of Camille Wells, the soloist in this performance. Camille Wells is presently the Associate Principal Oboe in the Auckland Philharmonia Orchestra. The concerto is entitled ‘Down a River of Time: Concerto for Oboe and Strings’ and proved to be a very melodic and quite arresting work. The oboe’s expressive and rather haunting timbre was well suited to this work, relating the passage of souls down through a river of time. Camille Wells created a very expressive atmosphere – from feelings of loss and sorrow through to ultimate peace and serenity. Although the work was new to both conductor and orchestra they melded with the soloist and accompanied in an empathetic and supportive way. Congratulations to orchestra and soloist for introducing the audience to an intensely emotional work, rather reminiscent of Vaughan Williams.

Mendelssohn’s Third symphony, the Scottish, was the final work. Finished some years after his first visit to Scotland when he began sketches on parts of it, it was dedicated to Queen Victoria. There was plenty of opportunity for impressive work from clarinets, flutes, oboes, bassoons, horns and trumpets. The strings were in sparkling form – good intonation and attention to phrasing and wonderfully sonority in Mendelssohn’s majestic and dramatic themes.

The conductor and orchestra received warm and well-deserved appreciation. Rogan Falla