Review of May 2015 Concert

VARIED PROGRAMME DELIGHTS AUDIENCE.

With Auckland in the grip of some “dirty” weather it was a pleasure to seek refuge in St Matthews in the City for the second of the St Matthews Chamber Orchestra concerts.

Said to be composed in the “Italian Style”, Schubert’s overture D591 with a lot of florid string passages and emphatic repetitive endings is clearly very like Rossini in its style. This work deserves to be heard in performance more often than it is, and it is surely to the credit of the St Matthews Chamber Orchestra’s programming personnel that they have included it in this concert series. It was also a joy to welcome Adelaide conductor David Sharp back to the podium and the orchestra under his baton gave a sterling performance of this colourful work.

The contemporary American composer Eric Ewazen’s oboe concerto featuring Camille Wells was next on the programme. Ewazen was a student graduate and later a staff member of the Julliard Music School, and has composed a significant body of music for solo horn, marimba, trumpet and other brass instruments as well as for vocal ensembles. His music is romantic in style but clearly written in the 20th Century idiom. Some of this work reminded me of Aaron Copeland’s compositions. Soloist Camille Wells is Associate Principal Oboe with the APO and in this concerto she handled all of the various moods of the work with sensitivity and great style. She was given a rousing ovation from a very appreciative audience. David Sharp too gave her great support with his direction to the orchestra.

The concluding item was Mendelssohn’s “Scottish” Symphony, which just happens to be a special favourite with me. His orchestration especially for the strings is very lyrical and conjures up images of the most wonderful Scottish scenery. From a very wealthy family, Mendelssohn had every advantage in life, and as well as being a most accomplished musician and composer he was also a skilful water-colour painter. Music and Art go together, but Mendelssohn clearly had a brilliant capacity for writing music that was able to evoke visions of beautiful scenery every bit as colourful as any painting. The first movement starts slowly and rather introspectively with a hint of sadness, but is followed by a bright and lively scherzo with some elegant melody. The following two movements Adagio and Allegro vivacissimo are played without interval, and bring the symphony to a majestic conclusion. David Sharp’s direction of the orchestra was a tower of strength and brought out all of the nuances and colour of this truly exciting Symphony. The ovation of the audience demonstrated just how much they had enjoyed it.

The next St Matthews concert will on Sunday 21st June and will feature conductor David Maurice with Cello soloist Rolf Gjelsten .
Bob O’Hara